James Bruchac was raised in the Adirondack foothills town of Greenfield Center, New York. A member of the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe, and eldest son of Abenaki and Adirondack storyteller Joseph Bruchac III, James grew up immersed in the natural world, storytelling and native culture.

James has both authored and co-authored books for all ages. Children’s books include How Chipmunk Got His Stripes, Turtle’s Race with Beaver, Rabbit’s Snow Dance, Raccoon’s Last Race, When the Chenoo Howls and Native American Games and Stories. General public titles include Scats and Tracks of the Northeast, Scats and Tracks of the Southeast, and Scats and Tracks of the Mid-Atlantic. James also co-authored The Girl Who Helped Thunder, an anthology of Native American tales. James is a member and former president of the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Upcoming releases include Kids in the Woods, James Bruchac’s Animal Tracking Adventure Guide, James Bruchac’s Woodland Survival Tips and The Stories He Tells, the Story of Joseph Bruchac.

As a professional storyteller James has shared stories at hundreds of schools and libraries across the country. Whether telling an interactive animal story or a monster tale, he keeps listeners of all ages on the edge of their seats as well as part of the action. James has performed at many festivals, museums including the Smithsonian Discovery Theater (Washington DC), the Corn Island Storytelling Festival (KY), Noble Tales Festival and the Connor Prairie Museum (IN), Indian Summer and Riverbend Festivals (WI), The Boston Children’s Museum and the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum (MA), the Hudson River Clearwater Festival, the Noteworthy Indian Museum, and The Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake (NY). James and other members of his family were featured on the PBS special Adirondack Storytellers (WMHT/PBS).

As a naturalist and outdoor educator, James has conducted tracking and wilderness survival-based research in all corners of the United States and Lower Canada. He has also traveled to places such as West Africa and Central America and continues his work with John Stokes and The Tracking Project in Corales, New Mexico. James is a graduate of the Tracking Project’s “Nurturing The Roots Community Mentor Program.” James’ tracking & wilderness programs include a variety of learning experiences: primitive and modern survival techniques, animal tracking, appreciation of the natural world, and Native uses of natural resources among other things.

                                   

Jim Bruchac – Native American Storytelling Presentations

BOCES ID

1419

For

K-2, 3-5, Middle school, High school

Categories

Storytelling

Curriculum

ELA

Costs

$300-$700

Dates Available

Year-round

Program Theme

James Bruchac was raised in the Adirondack foothills town of Greenfield Center, New York. A member of the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe, and eldest son of Abenaki and Adirondack storyteller Joseph Bruchac III, James grew up immersed in the natural world, storytelling and native culture.

James has both authored and co-authored books for all ages. Children’s books include How Chipmunk Got His Stripes, Turtle’s Race with Beaver, Rabbit’s Snow Dance, Raccoon’s Last Race, When the Chenoo Howls and Native American Games and Stories. General public titles include Scats and Tracks of the Northeast, Scats and Tracks of the Southeast, and Scats and Tracks of the Mid-Atlantic. James also co-authored The Girl Who Helped Thunder, an anthology of Native American tales. James is a member and former president of the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Upcoming releases include Kids in the Woods, James Bruchac’s Animal Tracking Adventure Guide, James Bruchac’s Woodland Survival Tips and The Stories He Tells, the Story of Joseph Bruchac.

As a professional storyteller James has shared stories at hundreds of schools and libraries across the country. Whether telling an interactive animal story or a monster tale, he keeps listeners of all ages on the edge of their seats as well as part of the action. James has performed at many festivals, museums including the Smithsonian Discovery Theater (Washington DC), the Corn Island Storytelling Festival (KY), Noble Tales Festival and the Connor Prairie Museum (IN), Indian Summer and Riverbend Festivals (WI), The Boston Children’s Museum and the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum (MA), the Hudson River Clearwater Festival, the Noteworthy Indian Museum, and The Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake (NY). James and other members of his family were featured on the PBS special Adirondack Storytellers (WMHT/PBS).

As a naturalist and outdoor educator, James has conducted tracking and wilderness survival-based research in all corners of the United States and Lower Canada. He has also traveled to places such as West Africa and Central America and continues his work with John Stokes and The Tracking Project in Corales, New Mexico. James is a graduate of the Tracking Project’s “Nurturing The Roots Community Mentor Program.” James’ tracking & wilderness programs include a variety of learning experiences: primitive and modern survival techniques, animal tracking, appreciation of the natural world, and Native uses of natural resources among other things.

Program Description

Native American Storytelling Presentations

From animal lesson stories (Grades K – 4) to trickster heroes & monster tales (Grades 3 – 12) audiences of all ages will not only be amused, but learn valuable lessons as well. Since most of the stories Jim shares have been passed down from generation to generation they also serve as great windows into Native culture. During Native storytellings Jim may also include the use of Native Instruments such as drums, rattles and flutes encouraging students to sing along with various songs and chants. When requested Jim can also expand on any cultural and philosophical connections found within the stories and songs he presents. (Grades K – 12)

Jim Bruchac – Storyteller, Animal Tracker, and Beyond

During this program audiences will be treated to some of Jim’s favorite stories including various Native legends, Adirondack tall tales, animal interactions combined with some of his own often comical life experiences. Story lovers of all ages will be taken on a journey of discovery and laughter. (Grades 2 – 12)

Author Residences & Workshops (Writing & Storytelling)

The focus of Jim Bruchac’s author visits can range from sharing a few stories from his books to comprehensive writing and storytelling workshops. During question and answer sessions Jim explains how growing up hearing Native legends from his father Joseph Bruchac and his real life experiences in the wildernesshis have influenced his storytelling and writing. During Writing Workshops, Jim helps students compose their own stories. Using his various books as examples, the most popular lesson choices include animal lesson stories (K – 3) and cautionary monster tales (4 – 12). For Grades K-2 Jim can create a group story complete with his own illustrations. Jim’s Storytelling Workshops (4-12) use highly interactive exercises to help students develop key storytelling techniques. In the context of longer residences students can not only create but share their own stories. Teacher oriented workshops are also available. (Grades 2 – 12)

Native American Culture and the Use of Natural Resources

Focusing on natural resources from plants, trees, rocks, animals, and water – to the soil beneath your feet – Jim provides physical evidence to show how Native Americans shaped these key resources into everything they needed to survive. Along with showing objects such as deerskin clothing, furs, a birch bark canoe, snowshoes, wampum, baskets and hunting tools, Jim also explains the ways this original reliance on the natural world helped shape the many Native legends, cultural values and social interactions that continue to this day. (Grades 2-12)

Field Trip to Visit Jim (at Ndakinna)

Schools, scout groups and all others within driving distance of Greenfield Center, New York, can visit Jim at his family founded Ndakinna Education Center & Nature Preserve. Housing all of his Native American exhibits with over 2,500 square feet of teaching space, the Education Center is surrounded by an 80-acre nature preserve. Half day to multiple day experiences offered. Visit www.ndakinnacenter.org for more information. (Grades 1 – 12)

Phone

(518) 583-9980

Address

23 Middle Grove Road
Greenfield Center, New York 12833

Associated Acts/Performances

Ndakinna Education Center & Nature Preserve

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